Katrina Anderson, Associate, Osborne Clarke

28 Nov 2019 10:15 | Anonymous


Katrina Anderson is a regulatory lawyer at Osborne Clarke who advises on e-commerce and advertising compliance. Before training as a lawyer, Katrina advised food manufacturers on brand and advertising strategy and ran her own consulting firm. In her interview, Katrina talks about how technology is driving new regulation. She also gives insight into the pressing issues of the food industry, on navigating the challenges of starting a new business, and her thoughts on female leadership. Keep reading to find out more!

You are a regulatory lawyer, advising clients on issues such as e-commerce, product labelling, and advertising compliance. When did you realise that you wanted to be a lawyer and what attracted you to this area of law in particular? Furthermore, how did your interest in business and technology shape your career as a lawyer?

I came into law quite late compared to most of my colleagues. When I left university, I went into brand and advertising strategy consulting for consumer goods companies, particularly in the food and beverage space. I did that for around ten years and really enjoyed my work, as I learned a lot about helping clients address their business problems. However, I realised I was looking for a change and I started to think about other options where I could help clients and advise on business problems. This led me to law.

The type of law that I do is very much about helping clients find pragmatic solutions to legal issues that work for their business. It is also about helping businesses see what new compliance issues are coming so they make informed timely decisions on how to stay up to date with compliance and regulation matters. The skill set I developed before becoming a lawyer provided me with a deep understanding of how business works, which has made me a better lawyer.

E-commerce currently plays a large role in the operation of businesses. How did the business regulations evolve in light of e-commerce’s growing impact?

Regulation has to change and adapt to keep up with ever evolving businesses. The biggest driver of such changes is often technology, and e-commerce is a good example of this. The first time we started seeing specific provisions in regulation related to e-commerce was in the early 2000s. At this time, the main concerns were related to consumer protection and ensuring consumers get the information they need to make informed decisions in a timely manner.

Twenty years later, the world has evolved. Today one of the most pressing concerns is the power of the big technology companies and the disproportionate bargaining power that they have. This is being addressed through regulation. For example, the European Union is now updating e-commerce regulation under the ‘digital single market’ initiative. Moreover, there are new regulations specifically designed to protect small businesses from the power of the platforms that they depend on to sell their goods and services.

Today one of the most pressing concerns is the power of the big technology companies and the disproportionate bargaining power that they have. There are new regulations specifically designed to protect small businesses from the power of the platforms that they depend on to sell their goods and services.

You are part of Osborne Clarke’s food law practice and have been interviewed on topical food law matters by various publications, including The Times. According to you, what is the most pressing matter in food law today? What are the challenges the field faces in light of matters such as climate change and multilateral trade agreements?

The answer to this question largely depends on what kind of business you are. For example, when talking about traditional meat-based businesses, the challenge of new technology such as lab-grown meat is incredibly important. However, this is just one sector of the Food & Beverage industry. When it comes to issues that involve the whole industry, the big focus in the United Kingdom right now is Brexit. Whereas, on an international level, it is more about sustainability.

Currently, there is a big focus on the use of plastics, and we are definitely going to see more initiatives aimed at reducing plastic dependence from companies and regulators in the coming years. However, sustainability is a much bigger debate than just how to reduce the use of plastics. For example, we need to develop more sustainable sources of protein, which would include lab grown meat and alternative sources such as insect protein. However, it is not currently clear how such products can be legally sold in the EU and if they can, how they should be regulated.

Osborne Clarke has adopted a wide diversity approach to its corporate structure. What is this approach? What do you value most about being part of such a team?

In terms of diversity, lawyers as a profession are on a journey. At Osborne Clarke, we have some great examples of successes on that journey. For example, Osborne Clarke’s partnership with WIL shows its commitment to gender diversity. Osborne Clarke has some inspiring female lawyers, who are experts in their areas, leading offices and teams. Our executive board is over 40% female, which is not a common occurrence in the legal world.

Osborne Clarke has some inspiring female lawyers, who are experts in their areas, leading offices and teams. Our executive board is over 40% female, which is not a common occurrence in the legal world.

However, what I value most about Osborne-Clarke’s approach to diversity is that it is not only limited to gender. There are various other initiatives in place that show our commitment to a wider diversity agenda. One such initiative is our mentoring scheme for BAME students which is designed to help them visualize their future in the field of law.

Before becoming a lawyer, you set up your own business providing strategic brand positioning advice to global food manufacturers. What led you to such an initiative? What is the greatest challenge you faced in the business’s creation and how did you manage to overcome it?

During my eight years as part of a large multinational corporate consultancy, I always thought that it would be exciting to set up my own business. I made the decision to retrain and pursue a career in law, but it was a long process. That process gave me the perfect opportunity to set up my own business and I was very lucky to work with some great clients.

The biggest challenge for me was definitely stepping out of an environment of a large company and all the support that gives you. Before, if I needed to send a bill or required a presentation template, there was a process set up for this. With my own company, I had to do everything myself from designing the presentation template to writing the slides to delivering it to the board and then sending the invoice and chasing payment. That experience gave me valuable insight into the challenges of setting up and running your own business. Now, a lot of my clients are technology start-ups and the insight I have into their world means I am able to give them better advice.

Now, a lot of my clients are technology start-ups and the insight I have into their world means I am able to give them better advice.

You are currently participating in the 5th WIL Europe Talent Pool Program (WTP). What does female leadership signify to you and what are the changes and developments you wish to see in the coming years?

I would like it if we got to a point where we spoke about leadership that comprised of males and females, and that we did not need a separate category of “female leadership”. Sadly, we are not there yet. One of the reasons why WIL is so powerful and needed at the moment is because we need an initiative to help women find opportunities for leadership and see a clear route to success.

Lastly, we would like to conclude our interview with a question from the Proust questionnaire: Which historical figure do you most identify with? Why?

Eleanor Roosevelt is my legal heroine. She chaired the committee for the United Nations Commission for Human Rights, which drafted the European Convention on Human Rights, which to this day, remains the bedrock of human rights in Europe.


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